Oxford Instruments delivers a state-of-the-art multi-million dollar system to the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, Canada.
22 January 2014

Oxford Instruments Omicron NanoScience has recently completed the commissioning of a state-of-the-art multi-technique deposition and analysis cluster tool at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC), University of Waterloo, Canada. This system features a multi-chamber design to grow and analyse new, high quality, thin film and layered structure materials under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The materials are being considered for implementation in the next generation of solid-state quantum computers and quantum information processors.

The cluster system provides MBE (molecular beam epitaxy) and UHV sputtering methods on multiple materials within the same device, ranging from metals and metal oxides to superconductors and topological insulators, but further offers XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) analysis of samples via Oxford Instruments’ ARGUS analyser. By being integrated within a single UHV cluster tool, such in-process analysis enables layer-by-layer quality control of the MBE and sputtering growth processes.

Professor David Cory, Canada Excellence Research Chair and Deputy Director, Research at IQC in Quantum Information Processing, said: “The new MBE cluster tool is the centre piece of our new lab and is the result of an intensive collaboration with Oxford Instruments. It offers a unique capability which we hope will provide a new direction for the development of quantum materials for use in a next generation technology.”

Dr Michael Cuthbert, NPI director at Oxford Instruments Omicron Nanoscience, commented: “The delivery of this state-of-the-art system demonstrates our commitment to support the quantum computing community in their race to build quantum computers. Our unique offering, ranging from fabrication to analysis and characterisation, allows us to partner with the most prestigious institutes and provide the technologies to develop science which could improve our lives in many ways. For instance, quantum computers have applications in such diverse areas as drug discovery, cybersecurity, logistics and so on.”

Oxford Instruments delivers a state-of-the-art multi-million dollar system to the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo, Canada.
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